Smart Vision Exam Demo

How to run a refraction exam during a pandemic? A few key points to remember

  1. Wear a face mask and gloves during the exam
  2. Use alcohol wipes to clean the device (including the eye cup) after each patient
  3. Keep 6 feet of physical distance between store employees and patients

Make sure to watch our training video for more details!


Best Practices for Telemedicine Prescribing

Get ready to learn from veteran Doctor and legal expert, Dr. David Silverman on telemedicine platform best practices and prescribing.

Dr. Silverman takes a deep dive into the language and best practices to communicate with doctors and technicians on the Smart Vision Labs telemedicine platform.

About Dr. David Silverman, M.D., Esq.

Dr. Silverman, M.D., Esq. is a Board Certified Ophthalmologist and active fellow of the American Academy of Ophthalmology. He has practiced Ophthalmology for over two decades; since completing his Residency at the University of Texas Medical Branch in Galveston, Texas in 1992.

Graduating Magna cum Laude with a degree in Cellular Molecular Biology, Dr. Silverman then attended Eastern Virginia Medical School in Norfolk, Virginia where he graduated with Honors. He then completed a year of training in Internal Medicine at the Greater Baltimore Medical Center before entering and completing his Ophthalmology residency.

Later in his career, Dr. Silverman found that he enjoyed moonlighting as a professor at a local university where he taught Human Anatomy and Physiology courses to aspiring doctors and nurses. This helped him rediscover his love for teaching, and he joined the faculty at the University of Kansas Medical Center so that he could help teach the ophthalmologists of tomorrow.

Most recently, Dr. Silverman returned to private practice, and he is now a member of the Eye Clinic and Laser Institute in the Space Coast region of Florida.


The Art of Prescribing with Telemedicine

The Art of Prescribing with Telemedicine

Are you interested in the process of how our prescriptions get calculated?

Learn from one of the experts! Dr. Lacey Dustin, analyzes different patient data and prescribes based on her years of practice. We cover extended examples from high minus patients to comprehensive referral.

About Dr. Lacey Dustin, OD

Since 2011, Lacey Dustin, O.D. has been providing care for approximately 100 patients per week of all ages at Harlem Vision Center, a busy clinic in an urban setting. At this location, she practices full-scope optometry with specialties including glaucoma management, diabetic ocular manifestations, cataract pre-operative and post-operative care along side of ophthalmology as well as refraction and contact lens fittings.

Lacey Dustin, O.D. received her doctorate degree from the State University of New York College of Optometry and a Bachelor of Science from the State University of New York at Geneseo, Magna Cum Laude. Dr. Dustin also completed additional training as an optometry extern at Wenzhou Medical Hospital in China as well as Brooklyn Veterans Hospital in New York. She has done an array of volunteer work such as an optometric mission trip to El Salvador and has served providing care to the athletes in The Special Olympics.

We are delighted and lucky to be able to work alongside of her.


The Telemedicine Advantage

The Telemedicine Advantage in Optometry

In the last two weeks, we have been asked by many optometrists and Ophthalmologists on how to run telemedicine for their practices. They are looking for solutions to help them deliver service to patients during and post pandemic.

Dr. Tihomira Petkova is an optometrist and vision scientist with deep clinical experience. During this webinar she discusses the advantages of using telemedicine in optometry.

Take a look at the webinar with Dr. Petkova: Here


Detecting Cataracts with Remote Wavefront Aberrometry

How the SVOne is detecting cataracts with remote Wavefront Aberrometry

Detecting cataracts and referring for comprehensive care:

Our wavefront refraction technology has the ability to detect early signs of cataract development. In this case, we demonstrate how our optometrists/ophthalmologists use Smart Vision Labs’ telemedicine platform to detect signs of early-stage cataracts and send for a comprehensive cataract referral.

The patient is an elderly gentleman visiting one of SVL’s partner eyewear retail locations. Patient went through the wavefront refraction test, and the data was reviewed by a licensed ophthalmologist. The doctor referred the patient for cataract evaluation. There are 3 data points standing out about the patient.

  1. Patient age is 75 years old, in the high possibility zone of developing cataracts.
  2. Patient’s unaided Visual Acuity for both eyes is 20/200.
  3. The wavefront images for both OD and OS show symptoms of light blockage in lens pathway; indicated by the red circles.

Exploring Mobile Vision Care

Good Hope Ministries distributes over 10,000 pairs of reading and prescription glasses a year in Malawi Africa using their SVOne device. The Good Hope team travels to about 90-100 villages each year, in 2019 they helped about 15-60 patients in each rural village.

Good Hope has received a second SVOne will now be able to open a walk-in eye clinic at their head office in February. They are expected to see at least 20-30 people a day in their new office.

All glasses are given free of charge in the villages and at the home base clinic, they charge $1.00 for a pair of glasses.

They are also able to give away 40-60 pairs of reading glasses in each village. Good Hope also visits four prisons in Malawi and distributes glasses there. They have tried other autorefractors, but now only use the SVOne. The SVOne works very well for the mobile vision care they provide.

 


Customer Spotlight: Becoming Profitable in 3 Months

Customer Spotlight with National Optical

How long did it take you to make a profit with the SVOne?

I broke even in about three months. I twas quite fast! We used to lose clients when they were told they had to wait for the one day that the doctor was in. With SVOne, however, I can do the exams every day. This has made business more stable and consistent. It’s less stressful and I save $500/week on human resources and other expenses.

Who is your average customer?

Our location is in a supermarket in Brooklyn that is busy with shoppers, so I get a variety of customers who come from diverse backgrounds. I get a mix of both walk-ins and word of mouth referrals.

How do customers respond to Smart Vision Exams? 

They love it for the convenience, speed, and accuracy. The exams take only five minutes. Vision exams used to be a three-person or two-person process. Now, it’s a one-person process. It’s more personable this way.  Since I am the only one doing the refractions and recommending lenses, they trust me more, and I can form closer relationships with them.  I have built a very strong personal connection with a lot of my clientele after using the SVOne device.

What tips about using the SVOne can you share?

The darker the room, the better. Turn off the lights as much as possible. I take the machine into a dark room so that I can catch the refraction quickly.


Increasing Accessibility

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How did SVOne help you to Increase your customer base?

By virtue of being an all-in-one optical solution. Instead of having customers go to an eye doctor, I’m a one-stop shopping experience. SVOne validates my service and professionalism. I am able to reassure and talk with the patient about their optical needs.

How do you use the device to increase revenue?

Some people don’t want to go to an eye doctor. Some customers like my service because of that. Some of my customers are immobile and are at home; I can go to them. I charge less on the vision test and make up for it by producing more prescriptions, which helps people get in the door.

Who is your average customer?

My average customer ranges from 25 to 55 years old. I have some patients with expired prescriptions who can’t afford a full exam. I talk with them about how it’s a visual test and how the device sends the information to an ophthalmologist.

How have your customers responded to using SVOne?

They are really impressed with it. I haven’t had to do many prescription redos. I’ve been remarkably surprised by that! My customers haven’t had many issues with the test results.

What tips about using the SVOne in your practice can you share with us?

I think the main tips are always clean the eyepiece in front of the customer. It’s important to always be professional. I talk with patients about centering the red light and then looking through the device to 10 feet away. It’s the little things that come with aligning the patients that take practice.

Can you tell us about some of your most rewarding experiences?

Last month, I was in a small home with a family of four. I was in their kitchen doing a vision test. I had their full trust while helping them with their vision needs. It was so amazing. It was much better than a cold unfamiliar establishment. You can‘t imagine this interaction outside someone’s home. Once you have their trust, it’s an amazing experience.

Grow your business with SVL

For more information about Top Opticians 

 


Protect your eyes when looking at the solar eclipse - Smart Vision Labs explains how

How to Safely View the Solar Eclipse

Quite Literally “Blinded by the Light”

Remember growing up when you would always be told to never look directly at the sun without wearing sunglasses? Well, I hope you listened to that advice. There are endless studies proving that eye exposure to direct sunlight can lead to solar retinopathy and serious eye damage. When you expose your eyes to direct sunlight, it burns holes in light-sensitive photoreceptor cells that can cause irreversible damage and even blindness. Think burning leaves using a magnifying glass (or ants if you were that kid growing up…) but only multiple times more intense. With the solar eclipse coming up in about a month, it’s crucial to remember that if you’re planning to watch one of nature’s most incredible phenomena, you must remember to protect your eyes when doing so, at least for the majority of the eclipse. And no – your everyday sunglasses will not suffice in this scenario.

According to NASA and other optometry and ophthalmology organizations, it is okay to look directly at the solar eclipse with the naked eye only when the sun is fully covered by the moon, the moment of a total solar eclipse. For the upcoming eclipse on August 21st, NASA claims that this full coverage will last 2 minutes and 40 seconds. During those moments, the day will turn to night and the sun’s outer atmosphere will be visible with the naked eye. Definitely, something you won’t want to miss. The duration of the partial eclipse is expected to last from 2 to 3 hours and will be visible from all parts of the U.S. The total eclipse, however, will only be visible to those on what’s called the “path of totality”, extending from Oregon to South Carolina. But in order to watch the entire eclipse, you must first know how to view it safely.

3 Options to Safely View the Solar Eclipse

Option 1: Do not – I repeat – do NOT think you can wear your everyday sunglasses to watch this. Instead, wear solar eclipse glasses or use handheld eclipse viewers to ensure full protection. Yes, you’ll look like you just walked out of a 3D movie, but you’re not trying to make a fashion statement here.

Option 2: If you don’t get around to purchasing a pair of eclipse glasses/viewers, consider using what’s called a pinhole projection with your hands. With your back to the sun, spread your fingers apart, and create a crossing pattern with both hands. The small spaces between your fingers will create a projection of images on the ground. During the partial eclipse, you’ll be able to see the sun’s crescent shapes. But again, make sure your back is to the sun. Let me just reemphasize that, this does NOT mean interlocking your fingers and holding them up to look directly at the sun. Let’s try to follow these directions. You’ll thank us later.

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Option 3: Use a solar eclipse lens or filter over your camera, binoculars, or telescope. Looking directly through one of these devices without a solar lens/filter will result in eye damage. In fact, they actually even further magnify the light rays on the retina and can lead to worse damage than just looking at the eclipse with your naked eye. Let’s try to avoid that.

How to view the solar eclipse and what not to do - Smart Vision Labs

Whichever option you choose, make sure to follow this advice to protect your eyes. In the U.S., this is the first solar eclipse since 1257 that has only touched American soil. But if you’re looking to travel, total solar eclipses occur about every 18 months around the world. So be sure to follow these safety tips to make sure that your eyes will be healthy and fully prepared to watch the next one.

Issy Bonebrake is a born-again New Yorker living down in the Village. She considers herself to be a self-proclaimed, cautiously optimistic futurist. As a classic rock aficionado, she enjoys binge watching rockumentaries from the coziness of her less than 500 square footage apartment. Issy is remarkably unenthused by space phenomena.

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