The portable SVOne Autorefractor by Smart Vision Labs

What Is the Gold Standard: Subjective or Objective Refraction?

A Practical and Complementary Approach to the Gold Standard of Subjective Refraction– Wavefront Refraction

We recently held a webinar with optometrist Dr. Tihomira on how to incorporate telemedicine into your optometry practice. Dr. Tihomira is a leading optometrist who embraced telemedicine and is influencing the technology development. One of the main topics she discussed was how automated refraction and telemedicine technologies are challenging the gold standard of subjective refraction. Subjective refraction is widely accepted as the optimal refraction method in the industry, despite how variable the process can be. So if subjective refraction is not necessarily the most repeatable method, why is it still considered to be the best way to determine someone’s prescription?

The use of a manual phoropter to conduct a subjective refraction continues to be considered the gold standard in the industry. The question is why? This process is influenced by multiple factors including; the ambient lighting of the room, the quality of the projections system, the cognitive awareness of the doctor and the patient during the process, and both the doctor’s and patient’s previous experience with refraction. All these factors play a role in the determination of the final prescription and the accuracy of that prescription.

Doctors try to control as many variables as possible but ultimately refraction remains a very variable process. A clinical study published by Bullimore illustrates the variability of subjective refraction. The study compared refractions done on the same patient by two separate clinicians and found that, for sphere, the 95% limit of agreement varied from -0.9 D to +0.6D. The study also reported that automated refraction is more repeatable than subjective refraction.

Automated Refraction

Wavefront aberrometry is challenging this gold standard of subjective refraction due to the repeatability of its results. When measuring the visual performance the technology assesses two components of the visual system: the optics that form the retinal image and the neural processing that transforms the retinal image into perception. Subjective refraction has historically been unique among methods of refraction. In considering both components in asking the observer to choose between a series of options, the goal is to optimize visual acuity.

However, wavefront aberrometry together with visual image quality metrics are changing the old model. A study published this year by Hastings et al. showed that 72% of patients preferred prescriptions generated using wavefront aberrometry optimized by visual image quality matrix, compared to prescriptions generated by subjective refraction. The SVOne autorefractor will include wavefront aberrometry in September of 2017.

The SVOne Technology

The SVOne autorefractor uses Shack-Hartmann wavefront autorefraction to capture 3 images per eye, taking 3 seconds per eye. Through the analysis of up to 120 points, a Zernike decomposition algorithm extracts the low order aberrations and converts them to sphere, cylinder, and axis. There are several unique features of the instrument, one of them is a least-squares reconstructor algorithm that adapts to pupil size on the fly. The device also features an open field design with machine learning algorithm allowing the system to – as soon as optimal pupil alignment is achieved – autocapture the measurements, thus eliminating proximal cues and limiting accommodation.

The SVOne is capable of measuring a wide range of refractive error, from -14 D to +14 D sphere, up to -7 D cylinder in 0.01D increments and axis measurements in increments of one degree. As you can appreciate from the image shown here, the device is very small, nothing like the autorefractor you are likely to find in most optometric offices. Additionally, it weighs less than 1 pound. To make the transfer of data easy, the device has the capability to store data in a HIPAA compliant cloud platform that can send data to your EMR.

Clinically Proven Accuracy of the SVOne Autorefractor

Clinical study data has been able to highlight the accuracy of the SVOne autorefractor. A study published by Ciufreda et al. in 2015 showed that SVOne refraction is accurate and has higher repeatability than subjective refraction. The study was conducted using 50 normal adults age 18 to 34, all correctable to normal vision. For all subjects retinoscopy, SVOne refraction and subjective refraction were determined and the difference between each of the findings and subjective refraction were quantified using the 95% limit of agreement.

data results from Smart Vision Labs clinical study

The table above shows the values calculated for the 95% LOA in diopters for retinoscopy and SVOne refraction as compared to subjective refraction. The table shows that for sphere, retinoscopy and SVOne show the same limit of agreement. Also, this finding shows that SVOne sphere measurements have variability similar to that of subjective refraction between clinicians as previously reported. The SVOne measurements for cylinder and axis were a bit more variable than retinoscopy, but as the authors concluded that could be due to alignment error, something that has been addressed by the introduction of a stand to which the instrument can be attached to, thus virtually eliminating misalignment errors and contamination of cylinder and axis measurements.

2-subjective-or-objective-refraction-data

The next table above shows repeatability data of 10 subjects. The data shows that SVOne refraction had higher repeatability than subjective refraction. This finding is again consistent with previous reports by Bullimore et al. showing that automated refraction is more repeatable than subjective.

The adult study was very strong but clinically we also needed to test the accuracy of the device on the majority of the population. A study was conducted to test how well the device performs within the pediatric population. Conducted by Rosenfeld et al., the study showed that SVOne refraction is also accurate in children and has higher repeatability than subjective refraction. The study was conducted using 40 normal children age 5 to 17, all correctable to normal vision. The study followed the same design as the adult study.

3-subjective-or-objective-refraction-data

The table above shows the values calculated for the 95% LOA in diopters for retinoscopy from SVOne refraction as compared to subjective refraction. The data shows that while sphere measurements using retinoscopy were a little bit more accurate, SVOne refraction varied by only additional +/-0.2 D, less than a quarter of a diopter. And both methods showed the same LOA for cylinder and axis.

4-subjective-or-objective-refraction-data
The next table above shows repeatability data of 5 subjects. The data shows that the SVOne has the highest repeatability across all components of the refraction, sphere, cylinder and axis. The study confirmed that the SVOne is an accurate and repeatable way to measure refractive error in children.

SVOne Refraction: The New Gold Standard?

Through clinical studies and the feedback and results from doctors using the SVOne, we were able to conclude that automated refraction and the SVOne are certainly challenging the gold standard of subjective refraction due to the accuracy and repeatability of refraction results.

SVOne technology is a practical approach to solve the challenge when subjective refraction is too costly or unavailable. If you are running multiple optical retail stores, and have difficulties to capture walk-in customers due to lack to ability to provide on-site vision exams. SVOne is the perfect solution to provide fast and accurate eyewear prescriptions to your customers. If you are running a mobile clinic, and conducting manual refraction is too cumbersome, SVOne is the solution to provide clinically proven vision care to your customers. If you are running an overseas mission trip, and facing thousands of patients in the duration of a few days, SVOne is the portable solution that can offer efficient vision exams in a big way.

If interested in learning more about the SVOne autorefractor, request a demo to see the refraction process.

Demo the SVOne Autorefractor

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svone autorefractor by Smart Vision Labs

Shopping for an Autorefractor?

Tips on How to Select an Autorefractor

SVOne Autorefractor from Smart Vision LabsWhen it comes to conducting vision exams, and specifically measuring just how much your patients’ eyes need to be corrected, an autorefractor is the optimal tool to measure the refractive error of the eye. There are many autorefractors on the market to choose from. But when considering the different purchasing options, it’s vital to decide which direction you would like to take your optometry practice and consider which attributes of an autorefractor allow you to move in that direction. The measurements taken by all autorefractors can translate into a prescription for eyeglasses or for contact lenses. But the SVOne autorefractor has a unique set of features that differ from the average desktop autorefractor. And why settle for just average?

The technology of the SVOne is a Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor, allowing you to view spotfield readout in real time. These types of sensors have the ability to measure a very wide range or local wavefront inclinations. This level of wavefront distortion is not typically accessible through other technologies. This is not your average autorefractor.

Physically speaking, the SVOne autorefractor can either be handheld or mounted on a height-adjustable stand. And for all you budding photographers/videographers, it is even compatible with a commercially available tripod. The SVOne autorefractor is perfect for the mobile optometry practice, or even for convenient mobility around an optical store or optometry practice. Its versatility makes it an excellent purchase.

The device itself has hands-free alignment, driven by a machine learning algorithm. The patient no longer needs to be seated with their chin in a stabilizing chin rest, as the machine will stabilize the image itself. Those clunky autorefractors in the dark optometrist’s office are pretty outdated. Don’t be afraid to try the new, innovative technologies. All the “cool kids” are doing it.

The SVOne weighs approximately 1 lb (454 g). Its lightweight feature makes it highly portable for the mobile optometry practice. It’s also perfect for that person who might skip the gym visit a little too often – even they will have no problem carrying this portable autorefractor.

Remember the days where all medical records were stored in file cabinets? Well, I don’t, I was barely alive for those days. But anyways, they are now long gone. This autorefractor has the ability to store up to 4,000 saved refractions right on the device and has unlimited refraction data storage in the cloud. And don’t worry about privacy and security, Smart Vision Labs is HIPAA compliant.

If you’re still the old-fashioned “I like a hard-copy of my records” kind of person, we have an option for you too. The SVOne autorefractor can connect to any AirPlay printer to print exam results. We have iPhone technologies to thank for that one.

In case you haven’t noticed, we’re all about speed and convenience. The vision exam itself is remarkably quick. And specifically, the data acquisition time is about 3 seconds per eye, and the autorefractor measures and averages 3 readings per eye. The results come in, figuratively speaking, in a blink of an eye.

And if you’re still skeptical, we have three clinical studies to prove the SVOne autorefractor accuracy. With the help of the SUNY College of Optometry and the Sports and Performance Vision Center, we were able to test the accuracy of this autorefractor in a population of MLB players, a general adult population, and a pediatric population. All three clinical studies concluded that the SVOne is well-equipped to measure a refractive index.

Lastly, if we still haven’t convinced you yet, we’ll play into your potential patriotic nature. All of our autorefractors are manufactured in the United States. So when returning to your optometry or retail operation with an SVOne, you can pride yourself on knowing that you gave your business to manufacturers on your very own soil.

If these attributes are anything your optical store or optometry practice is looking for in an autorefractor, request a demo of the SVOne to further see why this device is the perfect option for you.

Demo the SVOne Autorefractor
Issy Bonebrake is a born-again New Yorker living down in the Village. She considers herself to be a self-proclaimed, cautiously optimistic futurist. As a classic rock aficionado, she enjoys binge watching rockumentaries from the coziness of her less than 500 square footage apartment. 

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How to ensure a new technology implementation is successful - Smart Vision Labs

Four Factors to a Successful Enterprise Technology Implementation

Something that is revolutionary for the rest of the world may not necessarily be the best option for you or your organization. You may decide to buy a new machine to make better lenses, but it turns out it is not simple to use and the time wasted could have been spent on acquiring a new customer. The same thing can be said for new technologies and their implementation in an organization.

However, what people fail to realize is that the new technology implementation often fails because of the miscalculations of the organization. Technology is meant to aid people and complement their daily activities and it is only as good as the people using it. Smart Vision Labs has deduced four factors that contribute to the success of new technology and its enterprise adoption in an organization.

1 – Make Sure the Technology Solution Is Aligned with Your Company’s Plan and People

One way new technology can add value is by aligning it to company goals and objectives. Not only should it be a driver of profits and revenue, it should also benefit the people handling it as well. It should be simple enough to get the job done, achieve great results while making life easier for anyone interacting with it. That “anyone” could range from the CEO to the customer. By making sure that the technology is a good fit for your company, you essentially relieve yourself of many problems including time-consuming firefights, sunk cost, and a waste of resources- if and when the project fails.

One of our earlier clients is a great example of this idea. They have monthly revenue goals which their individual stores are budgeted to hit and their CEO drives this metric down to each individual team member. Our telemedicine platform fit their goals perfectly! The opticians and sales people using it found it effortlessly simple and we helped them increase their capture rate on an individual store level, which lead to even higher revenues and an ROI of 880%!

2 – Understand the Technology

Once you have verified that the technology will be a good fit for the company, it’s time to dive deeper and understand the technology. At this stage, the initial pilot is crucial to ensure its success. By working with the technology provider, the organization should be prepared for any initial uncertainty, commit to training, start identifying kinks in the system, and create processes for analysis and constant feedback. Working with the vendor is vital at this stage. The most innovative technology providers will work closely with the buyer to ensure that the implementation is successful, thus leading to a successful rollout.

One of our partners understood this concept and has excelled because of the time they took to embrace and understand the nooks and crannies of our technology. They launched a pilot and took steps to ensure that everything was recorded and every uncertainty accounted for. Feedback and collaboration worked out to make the implementation a complete success.

An Optical Industry Case Study

A company who has truly embraced technology is Mykita. Mykita is a German manufacturer of hand-crafted prescription frames and glasses. They use acetate, stainless steel, and a unique material called Mylon by employing a 3D printing process called Selective Laser Sintering. Technology is a core part of their design and their success shows it! Because of their design philosophy, they were profitable since their second year and are now in stores all over the world, including Washington DC and New York. Since their inception, they have racked up influencers like Tom Cruise, Lady Gaga, Brad Pitt, and Angelina Jolie, who have embraced their tech savvy designs. This leads us to our next factor: have influencers for your technology.

stanley-tucci-joshua-transformers-age-of-extinction-mykita-mylon-pandara-glasses
Stanley Tucci wearing Mykita Mylon in Transformers

3 – Have an Influencer on board

Mark Zuckerberg once said, “Nothing influences people more than a recommendation from a trusted friend.” A new technology that aligns with the spirit of your company will go even further if it is trusted by the people of your company, and having a person or two to influence that trust is crucial. If it’s a new project based on the new technology, then it should be a strong project manager or leader who takes charge, is exploratory, collaborative, and open to feedback. Given that these people will be the main people communicating up and down the chain of leadership, they will have to command authority. That person will essentially ensure user participation to drive the goals and metrics and will be molding the minds of everyone in the organizations, including the people resisting to accept that the new technology aligns with the company and will drive value. The influencer has to be a truly innovative leader.

A great example of a Smart Vision Labs champion is Vlad from Modern Day Optx. Vlad is an independent optical owner. Even though he is not a part of a large organization, his activities are reminiscent of the points mentioned before. He has internalized all the nuances of our telemedicine solution, he communicates and provide ongoing feedback to improve our product, and makes sure his customers are comfortable with using the technology. He has been able to prove the utilitarian use of our device by vastly improving his capture rate and revenue for his optical store.

screen-shot-2017-07-20-at-5-08-21-pm
Yelp review about Modern Day Optx

4 – Have Fun and be Personal

People are afraid of the unknown and of things they do not understand. Initially, new technology can be intimidating. The trick is to make the technology a personal piece of the lives of the people who are involved with it. Whether it be the CEO, middle-level management, or even the team member on the floor who is pushing to make the daily, weekly, and the monthly sales quota; having fun with the technology is a very important piece of the implementation process. Any company which grasps this factor should have a seamless rollout of the new technology.

How to truly have fun is a question of the organization’s personality. It needs to be worked out between the organization itself and the technology provider. It could be as simple as incentivizing the sales team with gifts when they accomplish a certain usage percentage, to more glamorous things such as throwing a lavish party when they decide to move from the pilot to full enterprise implementation. The end result should always be to inspire the users to embrace the technology.

At Smart Vision Labs, we try to go above and beyond in this category. From sending custom onesies to a partner who had a child, to being with our partners on the floor, celebrating accomplishments with them and making sure that they truly internalize the training; our work is complete when our partners are truly comfortable with our platform. We make sure the education, training, and implementation is a fun experience so everyone is happy to be a Smart Vision Labs optical partner.

An Optical Industry Case Study

Carl Zeiss shook lens manufacturing with their i.Terminal technology. They digitized the tedious and manual process of lens fitting and made the whole experience faster and more accurate. This has led to increased customer satisfaction and improved sales. But the technology has truly been pioneered because of the above mentioned four factors Zeiss had helped foster with their customers. They built a product that provided great value for their customers, the literature and support they provide during the implementation, along with the great customer service, ensured an easy adoption of the technology.

zeiss-iterminal-miracle16-980x308
i. Terminal by Carl Zeiss

A master grasp of these four factors will ensure your organization will have success with a new piece of technology. Effective implementation could be hampered if one or more of the factors are not accounted for. Make sure your team is an important part of the process; take your time to understand why problems happen, and make sure \you have fun when using the technology!

wavefront autorefractor demo - Smart Vision Labs

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SVOne Autorefractor from Smart Vision Labs

The Essential Equipment Guide for a Modern Optometry Practice

Essential Equipment for a Modern Optometry Practice

The modern optometry practice is one that has the latest technological advancements, provides the best quality service, and produces a very convenient customer experience at an affordable price. No matter how many lanes you have in your practice, it all boils down to the doctor and the equipment the doctor utilizes. The doctor is hard to change and if you are not a customer centric doctor, then you will need to rethink your strategy. The equipment, however, will provide the best doctors with an increased ability to do an even better job further setting them apart from their competition. Here are the essential tools that your optometry practice could be use to achieve a higher threshold of success.

Get an autorefractor for your eye care practice from Smart Vision Labs

Digital VA System

A digital VA chart is a very popular equipment in contemporary optometry practices and optical stores all over the U.S., and there is good reason why. A comprehensive digital VA chart squeezes in a lot of features and vastly diminishes the footprint in your business, with some even going as far as featuring a lens clarity visualizer tool. A good digital VA chart system will, along with a standard Snellen chart, allow you to randomize the letters, provide charts for different clinical situations including astigmatism, ETDRS, and even the ability to input the distance in between the patient and the screen.

em_screen
VA System by Harvest Acuity

Tonometer

A tonometer conducts eye pressure tests, but to the average person, this machine essentially is the one that blows the puff of air into their eyes. Optometrists, on the other hand, know how crucial this piece of equipment is. Tonometers have come a long way from the days of a schiotz tonometer. There are tonopens, which are the closest in terms of its reminiscence to a schiotz tonometer, an affordable option if you are looking to invest less capital for equipment. Along with that you also have the non-contact tonometers where the person rests their face for the procedure. Whatever equipment you decide to buy, this is essential for any optometry practice.

nt-510
Tonometer by Marco

Fundus Photography Equipment

Breaking it down simply, fundus photography equipment is used to take pictures of the inside of your eyes. Colloquially called a fundus camera, these imaging pieces of equipment are common for most ophthalmic equipment manufacturers and they usually take up a big footprint in your office because of the desktop based design of the equipment. However, in recent years a variety of inexpensive equipment options have come out. Ones that can be attached to a high-resolution digital camera or a camera in a smartphone for the retinal imaging. Although, the efficacy and accuracy of these more inexpensive alternatives are still debated.

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Welch Allen iExaminer

OCT Imaging Equipment

Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) equipment is what is used for taking images of the retina. The advantage of this equipment is you can really dig deep into what problems the eyes can be having and even detect the early onset of various eye diseases and conditions. This is one piece of equipment that should be there in your practice if you decide to expand the medical scope of your practice.

An OCT Machine
OCT Machine

Autorefractors

An autorefractor is the optimal tool to measure the refractive index of the eye. Whether you have a full fledged practice with the most cutting edge ophthalmic instruments or a mobile optometry clinic, an autorefractor will ensure the most convenient customer service while maintaining a superlative standard of care. The best way to go is to purchase a handheld autorefractor. The Smart Vision Labs wavefront autorefractor is currently the most affordable and portable piece of optometry equipment, and there are clinical studies to validate the efficacy of the equipment on a variety of ages and populations.

An autorefractor is the best addition to have in your lane, along with your phoropter, because of the rapid throughput it provides. With the Smart Vision Labs autorefractor expect rapid results with incredible accuracy.

SVOne Enterprise from Smart Vision Labs

As your practice grows over time, you will be adding equipment slowly. An investment in the equipment becomes more than just a capital investment as it aids in providing a better user experience for the customer. A combination of these pieces of equipment will certainly make your practice stand out.

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The Refractive Error of Professional Baseball Players

For MLB Players, 20/20 Vision Just Isn't Enough

The Elite Vision of Major League Baseball Players

In the professional leagues, hitting a pitched baseball has been described as one of the most difficult tasks in any sport. A baseball, barely 3 inches in diameter, is pitched at speeds over 90 mph, taking less than half a second to reach the plate. And in that time, the batter must judge the pitched ball and decide if and when to swing, in just milliseconds. It’s not difficult to understand that remarkable level of difficulty. Think about that next time you’re arguing that the Cubs only won the 2016 World Series because of the rain delay.

Generally speaking, baseball players can see with substantially more precision than the average human, with an extraordinary ability to focus on an object. Normal vision for the average person is typically described as being 20/20. Baseball players, on the other hand, have shown to have visual acuity approaching 20/12 (20/8 is often considered to be the best humanly possible vision). Elite vision clearly indicates a profound ability to quickly judge how to successfully hit a pitched ball. Maybe this can shed some light on why Michael Jordan, arguably one of the best athletes of all time, for the life of him could not successfully hit a baseball.

So to those of you normal 20/20-vision people, with the “baseball’s the most boring sport to watch” and the “baseball requires little athleticism” comments, get out and try to hit a professionally-pitched ball before judging a player for whiffing one of Corey Kluber’s pitches.

MLB players have elite vision - Smart Vision LabsWith the help of ophthalmologist Dr. Daniel Laby and the SUNY College of Optometry, we conducted a study to prove our hypotheses. During the 2016 Spring Training Season, Dr. Laby tested over 600 MLB players using our handheld wavefront autorefractor, the SVOne. The results of the study showed that the SVOne autorefraction system can successfully measure the small, yet significant, refractive errors in the sample of players that were tested. In general, almost all of these athletes are clinically proven to have little to no error in refraction, which differentiates them from the general population and consequently leads to their profound ability at hitting a baseball

The results of the exam did conclude, in fact, that baseball players tend to have visual acuity around 20/12, meaning that a baseball player can see from 20 feet away what the average person can see from only 12. And for those demonstrating slight refractive error, if left uncorrected, it could decrease vision to at least 20/20, likely making them inadequate at batting at a similar level to most MLB players.

But I’m not saying that almost all baseball players naturally have vision better than 20/20. In fact, Laby estimates that up to 20% of MLB players wear corrective lenses when playing. And players with 20/20 vision are increasingly wearing lenses to achieve this level of elite vision that so many of their teammates naturally have.

So imagine when scouting players, you can use Smart Vision Labs’ portable autorefractor to conduct vision tests. You potentially might find that a player with tremendous potential has a slight refractive error, and given even the slightest correction, it could be the difference between this rookie batting an average of .260 versus a .300.

Only about 5% of minor league players end up making it to the major leagues. By being able to accurately detect any slight refractive error and subsequently correct for that error, players are then competing for the few major-league spots on an even playing field. And even if you still don’t end up making it – just blame it on your subpar, natural 20/20 vision. Or maybe even use that “rain delay” excuse.

Like I said, hitting a baseball requires being able to judge the rotation of the ball – coming at you around 90 mph – standing 60.5 feet away. In the milliseconds it takes to reach the plate, the batter has to process what he sees and then decide how to effectively swing. The quicker the batter can identify the type of pitch thrown, the more time they have to prepare for their swing – hitting earlier on a fastball and later on a curveball. It shouldn’t be much of a surprise that it just might help to be able to see as best as humanly possible.

Some MLB players have vision better than 20/12. Take Red Sox second-baseman Dustin Pedroia, for example. In his book, he wrote that his vision is “something like 20/10” – although that’s really not much of a surprise. And as if people don’t already love to gather ammunition about Yankees players, retired player Kevin Youkilis has been said to have 20/11 vision. Evidently, above-average visual acuity is essential to succeed in baseball.

So whether you’re a major-leaguer looking to improve your batting average, a minor-leaguer looking to land one of those few major league spots, or maybe you’re just someone hoping for a career in professional sports, why not ensure you’re giving yourself the best chances at successfully hitting a ball and, on a larger scale, improving your overall hand-eye coordination? With the SVL exam, you can check for these potentially minor refractive errors and subsequently correct for them. And who knows, with this newly corrected, elite vision, maybe the Indians will – after almost 70 years – finally again win the World Series.

Issy Bonebrake is a born-again New Yorker living down in the Village. She considers herself to be a self-proclaimed, cautiously optimistic futurist. As a classic rock aficionado, she enjoys binge watching rockumentaries from the coziness of her less than 500 square footage apartment. Ironically, Issy is a Cleveland Indians fan and actively asserts that the 10th inning rain delay is why they lost the 2016 World Series.

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New Study reveals the SVOne Autorefractor successfully measures the small yet significant refractive errors of professional baseball players


The Refractive Error of Professional Baseball Players

MLB Clinical Study Identifies Best Way to Track Elite Vision and Improve Batting Performance

New Study reveals the SVOne Autorefractor successfully measures the small yet significant refractive errors of professional baseball players.

New York, NY – July 5, 2017, Smart Vision Labs (https://www.smartvisionlabs.com/) announced today the release of their latest clinical study on The Refractive Error of Professional Baseball Players, The study concludes that the SVOne wavefront autorefraction system is effective in detecting extremely small, but important, refractive errors in professional baseball players.

According to the study, hitting a baseball is one of the most difficult activities in sports. Previous research has found that professional baseball players have visual acuity of approximately 20/12. In comparison, the visual acuity for the general population is two lines worse, or 20/20. Clear and sharp vision is extremely important for a batter to have the best chance to actually hit the ball successfully. Small deviations in the refraction of the eye can, reduce vision and thus negatively impact the performance of a baseball player.

Even a small refractive error, left uncorrected, could decrease vision to the “normal” 20/20 level (or perhaps even worse), which is likely insufficient to allow optimal batting performance. Additionally, the impact of any refractive error, if present, on the batter’s visual function is often greater than what is seen in the average population with a similar refractive error (authors’’ clinical experience).

The baseball, barely 3 inches in diameter, is often thrown at speeds approaching 100 mph from a distance of 60 feet 6 inches. The batter must predict, based upon the initial trajectory of the ball as well as the ball’s spin, where and when it will cross the plate allowing him to strike it with a wooden bat a mere 2.75 inches in diameter. It is not difficult to understand why hitting a baseball is often termed the most difficult task in all of sports and why excellent visual function is required for success. In fact, baseball is one of the rare times in life when you are considered highly skilled for being successful only 30% of the time.

“We are excited by the results of this study” said Yaopeng Zhou, Smart Vision Labs, CEO and Co-Founder. “This is the 3rd clinical study to validate the accuracy of our device and its ability to pick up on the smallest changes in refraction. Gaining the trust of the teams in this MLB study was an additional vote of confidence.“

“The SVOne is extremely accurate and an exceptional tool to measure vision correction”, said Daniel M. Laby, MD; Director of the Sports and Performance Vision Center at the SUNY College of Optometry. The device is able to detect extremely small focusing errors which can make a huge difference in professional ball player’s success.”

Methodology
The study was lead by Daniel M. Laby, MD, Director of the Sports and Performance Vision Center at the SUNY College of Optometry In New York City. The study included 608 MLB players (both minor and major league), from five teams, during the 2016 spring training season. All MLB players were males. Of the 608 players screened, 557 had autorefraction performed (51 players did not complete autorefraction due to their unavailability or not being able to complete the test). Players who had refractive surgery (25) or players who were wearing contact lenses at the time of their screening (116) were not considered eligible for analysis. Additionally, three (3) players were not entered properly into the autorefraction database and could not be identified, and thus included, in the analysis. Thus, a total of 413 players were deemed eligible for final inclusion in the study analysis. Screening took place in a dedicated room at each team’s spring training facility. Screening consisted of a brief ocular history followed by autorefraction using the Smart Vision Labs SVOne autorefractor, other tests of vision (OptimEYEs), hand-eye coordination and reaction time (SVT) as well as visual concentration and multiple object tracking (Neurotracker) were also performed.

This study, as well as all of the Smart Vision Labs published clinical studies can be found here:
https://www.smartvisionlabs.com/how-it-works/accuracy/

In addition to baseball, additional studies have been conducted involving other sports which highlight the relationship between elite vision and performance. A study recently performed in the UK, published on June 8, 2017 in Science and Medicine in Football, concludes that the vision of soccer players is superior to that of healthy non-athletes. These results were confirmed in an additional study from the John Moores University, Liverpool in cricketers.

About Smart Vision Labs

Smart Vision Labs is making vision care less expensive, less complicated, and more accessible. Using the SVone Autorefractor doctors and optical stores can use the power of wavefront aberrometry to provide accurate prescriptions for glasses in minutes. Their proprietary technology shrinks expensive, bulky equipment into a portable device that can be adapted to both a stand alone autorefractor as well as a telemedicine platform. Founded in 2013, Smart Vision Labs aims to increase access to vision care by leveraging technology and innovation. Over 60,000 vision tests have been performed to date in 23 countries, including in partnership with numerous nonprofit organizations and NGOs providing eye-care services to underserved populations here in the US, as well as in India, China and Africa.

If you are interested in providing Smart Vision Exams technology in your store or practice contact sales@smartvisionlabs.com


New Study Demonstrates the Clinical Utility and Accuracy of the SVOne Autorefractor for Measuring Refractive Error

NEW YORK, NY — Smart Vision Labs, Inc., the maker of a smartphone-based autorefractor, announces the release of new data on its SVOne autorefractor being published in a leading peer-reviewed publication. In a study led by Kenneth J. Ciuffreda, OD, PhD, FAAO, FCOVD-A, FARVO, and Mark Rosenfield, MCOptom, PhD, FAAO, the smartphone-based SVOne aberrometer was shown to be comparable with subjective refraction and an office-based autorefractor when measuring refractive error under both cycloplegic and non-cycloplegic conditions in visually normal young adults. The researchers heralded the SVOne as valuable for examinations taking place both inside and outside the clinical setting.

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